Point to point linking.mp4

What is a linker?

Making up knitwear can be quite a chore, and using a linker makes it a lot quicker.  Linkers make a chain stitch, which is extensible so will not burst the seam when the fabric is stretched.

Domestic linkers can be operated by hand or have a motor. The most common make in the UK is the Hague linker, which is blue, and made in the UK by Hague. It can used on a table, or mounted on its own stand. When joining large pieces whilst working a table you have to be careful that the pieces don’t drag as the dial revolves as this is likely to effect the stitch formation and make the machine heavy to use. Using a stand means that larger pieces can hang down and revolve with the dial.

Hague type linkers make the stitch on the outside of the dial where the needle is positioned, and the chain on the inside where the looper is situated. A linker is a usually circular, and has a dial of spikes radiating outwards. These are called ‘points’ and as with a knitting machine, the number of points per inch is used to describe the gauge of the linker.

Linkers have large eyed, usually curved, needles and are designed to be used with a similar weight yarn to that in which the garment has been knitted, e.g. a linker with 5 points to the inch will take yarn of similar diameter/count to that used on a domestic knitting machine. The linker in this video has more points per inch than one intended for use with domestic machines; it is probably a 10-12 point model.

Linking different gauges of knitting

Obviously its not possible to have a linker for each of your different machines, or for hand knits, but the good news is that you can use a linker for different gauges of knitting. If the stitches are wider spaced than the points, spread them out so that not every point has a stitch; the chain will carry over the odd empty point. If the stitches are closer together than the points, it is a little more difficult as you have to double them up on the points, and to frequent doubling can lead to a gathered seam, so I wouldn’t recommend using a domestic linker for finer than 8gge knitting.

Before starting, hold the knitting up to the dial (remember that the circumference of the dial is smaller at the inner end of the points, where the stitches are made), and estimate how often you need to add a space, or double-up on a point. Make a note of this, and put the stitches up onto the points with evenly spaced gaps or double stitches.

Linking tips and troubleshooting

If the garment is knitted in a fancy of fluffy yarn, I recommend linking with a smooth, strong yarn of a suitably matching colour instead.

The tension of the chain stitch can be adjusted with a thumb screw, and it is important to use this adjustment to achieve successful linking. Put broadly, over-large and/or missing loops indicate loose tension, and skipping, dragging and stiff operation indicates too tight, but the only way to get it right is to practise on scraps of knitting prior to sewing the garment.

In very rare circumstances the timing of needle and looper can become disrupted, and it is impossible to get the linker to make stitches; the needle may break or bang into the looper, or the looper may be totally out of synch with the needle thrust. Although it is possible to adjust this yourself, unless you are very experienced with the machine and understand how the stitches are formed, I recommend sending the linker to Hague for repair.

Preparing your knitting

When preparing knitting for point-to-point linking the last row of main yarn knitting is not bound off; the stitches are left ‘live’. Before removing the knitting from the machine, 10-20 rows of ‘waste’ yarn are knitted, then the piece is knocked off the machine without binding off. When choosing ‘waste’ yarn, aim for a strong colour contrast in a yarn that is slightly thicker than the main yarn. A thicker yarn will open the last row of stitches, making it easier to insert the points, and a contrast colour helps the operator pick the correct row of stitches to catch onto the points. Try to choose smooth waste yarns; fluffy ones may leave contrast colour fibres when the waste is removed.

More detail about the video example shown above

The video above shows how to point-to-point link a double thickness, folded collar around the neckline of a garment. The collar in this example has been knitted across the needle bed of the knitting machine, with ‘live’ stitches left at both start and finish as follows:

  1. cast on with waste
  2. work 10-20 rows waste
  3. change to main yarn and knit the number of rows required for the collar outer depth e.g. 20 rows
  4. knit a loose tension fold row if you want one
  5. knit a second series of rows equal to the inner depth of the collar, e.g. 20 rows
  6. change to waste yarn
  7. knit 10-20 rows
  8. remove the knitting from the machine

See ‘Preparing your knitting’ for how to work the joining rows between main and waste yarn to facilitate easy linking.

Putting the knitting onto the linker

Before starting to put the collar and garment on the linker, check whether your linker makes the stitches inside or outside the dial, and position the piecs accordingly. In my example, the stitches are on the outside, the loops inside.

Put the open stitches of the inner edge of the collar onto the points as described in the video, (wrong side facing in this example), and then put the garment neck onto the points (right side facing the operator in this example). Finally fold the collar over the top of the garment neck edge, and catch the open stitches onto the points – make sure to align the inner and outer stitches so that the collar is not twisted.

Sew through the three layers, and pull the end back through the last chain to secure the linking. Remove the garment and unravel the waste yarn back to the main stitches. Take care on the last row, and if any stitches have been missed, catch them with a pin or a strand of waste yarn. I find those little safety-pin stitch markers very useful for this on domestic- machine knits.

Hague direct’s website

 

 

 

 

 

On becoming a Freeman of the Worshipful Company of Framework Knitters

I was admitted to this company last month in an ancient ceremony at Goldsmith’s Hall in London. The Worshipful Company is one of the 108 Livery Companies of the City of London which evolved from the medieval trade Guilds which came about through the natural inclination of men in the same trades and occupations to join together for friendship, support and protection.

The website explains the history in full, but this quote explains some of this:

“The Worshipful Company of Framework Knitters had its origins in 1589 when William Lee of Calverton in Nottinghamshire is credited with the invention of a machine for knitting mechanically. It was incorporated by Oliver Cromwell, Lord Protector of the Commonwealth, on 13th June 1657 and was re-incorporated and its privileges extended by Letters Patent of His Majesty King Charles II on 19th August 1663 with the style, “The Master, Wardens, Assistants and Society of the Art or Mystery of Framework Knitters of the Cities of London and Westminster and the Kingdom of England and the Dominion of Wales”. Image

me outside the Goldsmith’s Hall

Waiting in the Goldsmith's Hall
Waiting in the Goldsmith’s Hall

 

See http://www.frameworkknitters.co.uk/ for more info

 

 

 

   
The Knitting Book by Vikki Haffenden and Frederika Patmore

The Knitting Book

The Knitting Book by Vikki Haffenden and Frederika Patmore
The Knitting Book

Best knitting information all in one volume is to be published on September 1st 2011.
The Knitting Book, written by Vikki Haffenden and Frederika Patmore, published by Dorling Kindersley is out on 1st September. Loads of technical info and samples as well as patterns, so whats not to like?

Communicating on FB rather than writing!

Managed to fill my morning with adding photos to FB and now wish I had worked…but there were some good things. I re-lived going to In the Loop 2 conference in Shetland in September which was a wonderful experience. There were such interesting things discussed, from images of knitwear in advertising to making a lace shawl from an old pattern from the photo library at the Shetland Museum via Ravelry. The shawl is no longer in existence and neither is the pattern.

That was inspirational, someone found the photo in the Shetland Museum online Photo Library, and asked around on Ravelry for help to write the pattern, and people from all over the world contributed. The pattern is now available via Ravelry as creative commons and there was an example of the shawl shown at the conference that was knitted by a disabled lady in a mid blue colour. I really liked the way in which the old (Shetland knitting) was taken by technological advancements (photography) and social network via the internet (the online photos and Ravelry) and re-invented into a tangible product from a virtual piece of evidence and put out into the world again.

Maybe I will list some of the other presentations as they come to mind, because I don’t believe it will be publilshed elsewhere

This is the link to the archive:
http://www.calmview.eu/ShetlandArchive/CalmView/

and the photograph library is here:
http://www.shetlandmuseumandarchives.org.uk/photoLibrary/

Here is a photo of the presentation

Shetland Shawl
Shetland shawl presentation at In the Loop 2